Blossom

Blossom

11.99

What Scotland Needs to Flourish (Post Indyref Post EUref edition)

Lesley Riddoch

ISBN: 9781912147526

Binding: paperback

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Back cover text:

Blossom is an account of Scotland at the grassroots through the stories of people I’ve had the good fortune to know – the most stubborn, talented and resilient people on the planet. They’ve had to be. Some have transformed their parts of Scotland. Some have tried and failed. But all have something in common – they know what it takes for Scotland to blossom. We should too…

Weeding out vital components of Scottish identity from decades of political and social tangle is no mean task, but it’s one journalist Lesley Riddoch has undertaken.

Dispensing with the tired, yo-yoing jousts over fiscal commissions, Devo Something and EU in-or-out, Blossom pinpoints both the buds of growth and the blight that’s holding Scotland back. Drawing from its people and history as well as the experience of the Nordic countries, and the author’s own passionate and outspoken perspective, this is a plain-speaking but incisive call to restore equality and control to local communities and let Scotland flourish.


Reviews:

Inspiring, galvanising analysis of the untapped potential of Scottish people power.  Karine Polward, singer/songwriter

Reading Lesley Riddoch’s Blossom is like inhaling fjord air after being trapped in a sweaty backroom. Just brilliant.  Pat Kane, singer and columnist

Blossom confirms Lesley Riddoch’s reputation as one of our top campaigning journalists.  Paul Hutcheon, Herald

A brilliant, moving, well written, informative, important and valuable piece of work.  Elaine C. Smith

Not so much an intervention in the independence debate as a heartfelt manifesto for a better democracy.  Esther Breitenbach, Scotsman


Table of contents:

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Chapter one: Scottish Identity
Chapter two: The Scottish Effect – Inequality Kills
Chapter three: Our Homes are not our Castles
Chapter four: Tenements and the Miracle of Sharing Space
Chapter five: Land, Land Everywhere but not an Inch for Sale
Chapter six: Scotland’s Natural Assets – Look, But Don’t Touch
Chapter seven: Supersized councils – Disempowered Communities
Chapter eight: Language – Many Mither Tongues
Chapter nine: Women – Harpies or Quines?
Chapter ten: Whose Culture is it Anyway?
Chapter eleven: Scotland's Year of Living Dangerously
Conclusion: What Scotland Needs to Blossom
Bibliography